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4.7 Children Missing from Home and Care - A Standardised Approach to Dealing with Missing and Absent Children and Young People Across Greater Manchester

NOTE:

Practitioners in Manchester and Oldham should also refer to Appendix G: Additional Local Information.

See also Greater Manchester Safeguarding Partnership Missing From Home Helpline.

AMENDMENT

In November 2016, the above link was added to the Greater Manchester Safeguarding Partnership Missing From Home Helpline.


Contents

1. Introduction and Background
2. Definitions and Explanation of Terms
3. When a Child Goes Missing (applies to all ‘Missing’ Children)
  3.1 Before Contacting Police
  3.2 Reporting to the Police
  3.3 Risk Assessment / Investigation
  3.4 When a Child is Found
  3.5 Safe and Well Checks (SWC)
  3.6 Independent Return Interview
  3.7 Referrals
4. Additional Considerations for Children Missing from Care (MFC) - Including Foster Care
5. Children and Families Subject to a Child Protection Plan
6. Intervention Meetings (Children / Young People Not in Care)
7. Missing from Non Residential Settings
8. Specific Circumstances
9. Collecting, Sharing and Analysing Data on Children who go Missing
  Appendix A: Contacts
  Appendix B: Formal Notification of Placing LAC Out of Area - Letter and Form
  Appendix C: Example Missing from Care Risk Assessment and Action Plan
  Appendix D: GM Return Interview Form
  Appendix E: Children Missing Education - Home Office Request for Information
  Appendix F: Greater Manchester Police: Missing and Absent Persons Policy
  Appendix G: Additional Local Information


1. Introduction and Background

These procedures are designed to provide a framework for a co-ordinated, standardised and effective response by LAs, police and partner agencies in Greater Manchester to reports of children who go missing and what steps local authorities and their partners should take to try to prevent them going missing again. When a child goes missing or runs away from home, care or school, they are at risk. The first part of this guidance therefore refers to protecting all children from the risks associated with going missing, whether they are looked after children or children who live within their family home. Later sections set out the additional steps to be taken in regard to children missing from care or other settings.

Many children will exhibit normal adolescent behaviour in testing boundaries and it is not helpful to consider every incident of lateness or absence for all people as high risk. Young people must not be reported missing as a behaviour management tool. However, some children will need to be treated as missing immediately due to their vulnerability. This protocol is based upon the principles of sound individual risk assessment, by carers, professionals and by GMP in classifying and responding to the incident.

References

This document should be read in conjunction with local Safeguarding Policies and Procedures, particularly around Trafficking and Exploitation - see Safeguarding Children Who May Have Been Trafficked Procedure and Safeguarding Children and Young People Abused Through Sexual Exploitation Procedure.


2. Definitions and Explanation of Terms

Missing – Anyone whose whereabouts cannot be established and where the circumstances are out of character, or the context suggests the person may be the subject of crime or at risk of harm to themselves or another.

Absent – A person not at a place where they are expected or required to be and where the circumstances and context suggest there is a lower level of risk.

Away from Placement without Authorisation – a looked after child whose whereabouts is known but who is not at their placement or place they are expected to be and the carer has concerns or the incident has been notified to the local authority or the police. These children would not be treated as either ‘missing’ nor ‘absent’ under the police definitions as their whereabouts is known even though it may be cause for concern.

Looked After – A child is “looked after” by a local authority if he/she is “in care” by reason of a court order, or if he / she is provided with accommodation for more than 24 hours by agreement with her/his parents or with the child if he / she is aged 16 or more.

Accommodated – A child is accommodated if he / she is looked after by the Local Authority with the voluntary agreement of his / her parents, or with the child if he/she is over 16 years old.

Child – A young person under the age of eighteen years.

Missing Person Safeguarding Officer – An officer of GMP’s Public Protection Division with specific interest for High and Medium risk missing person.


3. When a Child Goes Missing (applies to all ‘Missing’ Children)

3.1 Before Contacting Police

When a child is identified as not being at a location they are meant or are expected to be at, the reporting individual (parent / carer / other agency) must take proactive steps to trace the person’s whereabouts prior to contacting the police.

Such steps would include:

  • Physical checks of the person’s residence or where they are meant to be, including any location the person may be hiding within the house / building;
  • Physical checks of any garden, garage, sheds, grounds and surrounding area(s);
  • Attempting to contact the missing person directly, via mobile phone, text, or social networking sites (i.e. Twitter / Facebook etc);
  • Contacting the missing individual’s family and friends.

If the person is located through such enquiries, they should not be reported as missing to the police unless there are significant safety issues with the person being there. In such circumstances, the reporting individual should contact the police and request a ‘Concern for Welfare’ address check.

If a child is located but is reluctant to return, the police may be requested to assist in their safe return, however the individual MUST NOT to reported as missing simply to facilitate involvement of the police in their return or as a behavioural tool.

3.2 Reporting to the Police

The Police will only become involved after all reasonable checks to locate the individual have been carried out. If the child is not located, the reporting individual should contact Greater Manchester Police via 101 to report them as being missing from their address.

The primary function of the Police is to investigate the disappearance and attempt to locate the young person prior to any harm befalling them or the general public. Police response and associated actions will be based on a police risk assessment of the incident and knowledge of the individual(s) concerned, which will utilise information from partners and those who know the person.

3.3 Risk Assessment / Investigation

When GMP receive a call reporting a child missing, the call handler will conduct an initial risk assessment to determine the appropriate status. The police will prioritise all episodes of children ‘missing’ from home or care as either ‘medium’ or ‘high’ risk. Where a child is categorised as ‘absent’, the details will be recorded by the police, who will also agree review times and any on-going actions with the child’s family, carer or responsible local authority.

All reported individuals aged 12 years or under MUST BE recorded as MISSING not absent.

The Police investigation and all resulting actions will be proportionate to the risk level accorded to the enquiry. Whilst partner agencies may have their own risk assessments, the GMP investigation will be proportionate to the GMP risk assessment allocated as below, which may be different.

GMP revised their procedure in June 2015 to reflect guidance from the National Police Chiefs’ Council to ensure that all children categorised as missing are identified as being at MEDIUM or HIGH risk.

High The risk posed is immediate and there are substantial grounds for believing that the subject is in danger through their own vulnerability, or may have been a victim of a serious crime; or the risk posed is immediate and there are substantial grounds for believing that the public is in danger. If the child is known or believed to be at risk of sexual exploitation, they must initially be categorised as ‘high’ risk missing.
Medium The risk posed is likely to place the subject in danger, or they are a threat to themselves or others.
Low In line with NPCC (National Police Chiefs’ Council) guidance it is no longer appropriate to classify children aged 17 years or under as low risk missing persons. All young people under the age of 18 MUST be classified as either Medium or High risk missing persons.

Risk Assessment is a dynamic process which is open to regular review from GMP as follows:

  • Twice during each shift by the Divisional Supervisor;
  • After 48 hours by CID;
  • After 72 hours by Chief Inspector - Operations;
  • After 7 days by Divisional Superintendent and referred to Missing Persons Section;
  • Every 28 days by Chief Inspector - Operations;
  • After 6 months by Divisional Superintendent.

Once a case is generated on the system as “MISSING”, an Initial Investigating Officer will be appointed. The initial investigating officer and all subsequent officers will carry out a thorough investigation in line with the latest published GMP Policy on “Missing Persons”. See Appendix F: Greater Manchester Police: Missing and Absent Persons Policy.

3.4 When a Child is Found

The attitude of professionals, such as police and social workers, towards a child who has been missing can have a big impact on how they will engage with subsequent investigations and protection planning. However 'streetwise' they may appear, they are children and may be extremely vulnerable to multiple risks. A supportive approach when a child returns, actively listening and responding to their needs, will have a greater chance of preventing the child from going missing again and safeguarding them against other risks.

Location of the Individual

If a ‘missing’ person is located by Police, their first consideration will be any concerns for their welfare and/or the circumstances (or location) at which they have been found. Where necessary, attending officers may consider the use of Police Protection Powers, as below. If the locating officer(s) has no concerns for the welfare of the individual, they must:

  • Conduct a Safe and Well Check;
  • Notify the family or carer of the individual’s location;
  • Ensuring the individual is safe, advise them on how to return home, where necessary, and otherwise leave the individual at the place he/she was located;
  • Close the report.
If a missing person is located by another agency or family member or returns of their own accord, the locating individual must notify the police of the individual’s location and any concerns they may have in order that the police can consider use of Police Protection Powers and complete a Safe and Well Check if they were ‘missing’.

If the Police and locating agency consider no concerns to be evident and the family allows the individual to remain where located, this decision is to be recorded in both the officer’s Pocket Note Book (PNB) and on the Safe and Well Check screen on the OPUS system when completed by the Officer.

When children missing from home are located but have not been reported missing to the police by their families, parents and carers should be encouraged to report any future episodes of running away. This may require particular work in some communities, for example those with high levels of gang crime. Local authorities should pro-actively consider investigating further to identify early any safeguarding concerns, or whether the child and their family need further support.

Return of the Individual

Police Protection Powers (PPPs) Section 46 of the Children Act 1989

When a child is located and the police officer has reasonable cause to believe that the child is likely to suffer significant harm, they may take the child into police protection. As PPPs have a time limitation, early thoughts should be given regarding actions to be taken when the PPP times out. This could include social services use of Emergency Protection Orders (EPO), or other measures available to the Local Authority such as recovery orders.

Statutory guidance on children who run away or go missing from home or care (January 2014) states that when a missing child is located, it is the responsibility of the parents/carers to collect the child, unless the circumstances pose a risk to them. In such circumstances only, the Police may be asked to assist in returning the individual but it must be recognised that the Police only have powers to return an individual who is not in care if circumstances are such that Police Protection is required. (See also Abduction / Harbourer's Legislation).

Where the locating officer has reasonable cause to believe that a person would otherwise be likely to suffer significant harm, the Police may take the person into police protection and return them to their home address, a place of safety, Local Authority accommodation or a place chosen by the Local Authority. A Police Station should not be considered an appropriate place of safety. Police Protection will not be used as a tool to simply facilitate the return of an individual. If any information is divulged by the individual when located that suggests they are not safe if they were returned home, this will be discussed with the Emergency Duty Team / Service (EDT) of the Local Authority to establish a course of action and a place of safety, if necessary. Officers will also consider markers on an address that indicate Abuse or other concerns or history.

Abduction / Harbourer’s Legislation

Under Section 2 Child Abduction Act 1984, the taking or detaining of a person under 16 without the consent of a person who is lawfully responsible for the child is an arrestable offence. Offender(s) can be arrested and prosecuted for this offence without a complaint from the victim. Evidence can be obtained from persons having lawful control of the victim and a formal interview with the offender.

Child Abduction Warning Notice

This is an official warning for an offence under Section 2 Child Abduction Act 1984. Chief Constables Order 2003/04, item 2, outlines the procedures for warning offenders who it is suspected are guilty of the above offence. This is an alternative to arrest and prosecution but can be cited in any subsequent prosecution. There is evidence of these notices being used successfully as deterrents against inappropriate relationships or contact with young people who regularly abscond.

Recovery Orders

Recovery Orders may be sought in respect of children who are either in care, subject to an Emergency Protection Order or in Police Protection, under Section 50 of the Children Act, 1989. They can be applied for in situations where a child is somewhere they should not be and there is deemed to be the need for Police to gain entry into accommodation and effect the child’s removal by force. The process is as follows:

  1. The LA Children’s Social Care (CSC) with Parental Responsibility (PR) should complete a risk assessment and take immediate advice from their Legal Services team. The LA will then liaise with the Divisional Duty Inspector to consider whether the child’s return can be effected without a Section 50 Order;
  2. If all other options are discounted, CSC will ask their Legal Services Department to apply to Court for a Recovery Order and inform Police when the application is to be made. CSC will specify whether the Court needs to authorise the Police to enter specified premises;
  3. Once the Order has been made, the Police must be informed by phone and a copy of the Order sent to the Divisional Duty Inspector. A strategy will then be agreed as to how to best execute the order, involving line managers if necessary;
  4. The agreed strategy will then be executed. Police will transport the child to a Police Station if necessary. CSC will be responsible for organising the required transportation of the child back to the placement. Ideally the allocated social worker should accompany the child in order to minimise further distress and anxiety;
  5. A joint debrief will then take place and consider any learning points.

Criminality of Others

When a missing person is located by any agency, but particularly by the Police, steps should be taken to ensure that all aspects of criminality are considered. On too many occasions a missing child has been located in the company of inappropriate adults and whilst the missing person is dealt with as a priority, little or no action or investigation takes place with regard to the adults concerned with the child’s activities whilst missing. Consideration should be given to possible criminal activity to which the missing child is victim, whether they consider themselves as such or not. See Abduction / Harbourer's Legislation, above.

3.5 Safe and Well Checks (SWC)

All missing children should have a police ‘Safe and Well Check’. The GMP Policy for children categorised as ‘missing’ states that SWCs should be completed within 24 hours of the person being located. The Sergeant on duty must sign off with a rationale if there was no SWC conducted.

The purpose of a SWC is outlined below:

  • Check for any indications that the person has suffered - or is suffering - harm and follow normal Child Protection Procedures if relevant, including consideration of a referral to Social Care for this young person and / or others in the household;
  • Identify where they have been;
  • Identify who they have been with;
  • Give them an opportunity to disclose any offending by, or against, them;
  • Offer and encourage a full return interview with a relevant agency, in areas where this service is available;
  • Provide information about support services, including Childline, particularly in areas where a full return interview is not available or is unlikely to be taken up, (See also Section 3.6, Independent Return Interview.

The SWC will:

  • Consider and record appearance and demeanour as well as verbal information;
  • Be recorded on the Police record on OPUS.

The individual must be informed about who else will receive the information gathered from a SWC and why and they must then sign the assessment record to show they agree to the information recorded. If possible and appropriate, the person should be talked to away from their parents / carers.

It is helpful if information from the SWC can be sent through to the relevant LA so that the person carrying out the Independent Return Interview can pick up on any observations made by the officer or disclosures and other important information provided by the child.

3.6 Independent Return Interview

When a child is found, in addition to the police Safe & Well Check, they must be offered an Independent Return Interview. This applies to all children who have been classified as missing by the police. Independent Return Interviews provide an opportunity for professionals to understand why the young person ran away, to uncover information that can be used to reduce the likelihood of the child going missing again; to address the risks or incidents they may have been exposed to while missing and the risk factors in their home life.

The local authority is responsible for the completion of the return interview. Statutory guidance states that this should be completed within 72 hours of the young person’s return to their home or care setting. While time is a factor in completing the interview, it is of equal importance that interviews allow space for the young person to tell someone what they are running from or running to in order that best support can be offered to safeguard them. This may mean a series of meetings to build a relationship where the young person feels safe to disclose. Therefore these procedures require all young people to be ‘offered’ a return interview within 72 hours. This may be recorded as the first contact in the return interview process, in recognition that is may not be a one-off task.

The interview should be an in-depth interview and should be carried out by an independent person (i.e. someone not involved in caring for the child and independent of the care-plan for the child) who is trained to carry out these interviews and is able to follow-up any actions that emerge. If the young person has a number of missing episodes in quick succession, it may be more important to talk about a pattern of missings over one interview with the young person to gain the best information in order to determine the best plan to safeguard them.

A Greater Manchester Return Interview Form (see Appendix D: GM Return Interview Form Template) has been devised in consultation with all GM LAs which can be used with children who have been missing from home and care. Young people need to trust the person before they talk about the often very traumatic reasons why they ran away or experienced whilst missing. An advocate who can build a relationship of trust with the young person over a series of missing episodes may put a young person at their ease so encouraging them to talk about their experiences. Children in care should be offered the choice of speaking to a representative or advocate who is independent of their placement or the responsible local authority. The IRO should be informed.

Each LSCB should identify clearly who is available in their area to do these with young people so that Police can offer the service at the Safe and Well Check. It is also crucial that any information gained through this interview is fed back to Police and to any intervention meetings so that a picture is built up and any issues can be dealt with.

In areas where there is no service to provide these interviews, this should be made clear to the LSCB including the Police so they can consider how young people can be adequately safeguarded and prevented from taking part in risky behaviours. This could include making a referral to schools or Parenting support teams. As a minimum, at the SWC young people should be offered the chance to speak to Social Care or encouraged to speak to Childline in confidence if they prefer.

Young people should be given information about what a return interview is about before they take part so they can fully contribute. By the end of the interview the interviewer should have made it clear to the young person what they are worried about and what steps they may take to address this. The Return Interview should also be an opportunity to share information with the young person on how to stay safe, including helpful numbers to call if they choose to run away again. LSCBs should also consider any information that can be left with a young person after an incident of missing by the Police Officer conducting the SWC.

Aims

(See Appendix D: GM Return Interview Form Template).

The interview should be held in a neutral place where the child feels safe. The interview provides an opportunity to hear from the child about why they went missing and to understand the risks and issues faced by the child while missing. The interview and actions that follow from it should:

  • Identify and deal with any harm the child has suffered – including harm that might not have already been disclosed as part of the ‘safe and well check’ – either before they ran away or whilst missing;
  • Understand and try to address the reasons why the child ran away;
  • Help the child feel safe and understand that they have options to prevent repeat instances of them running away;
  • Provide them with information on how to stay safe if they choose to run away again, including helpline numbers.

This could include exploring issues where a child:

  • Has been reported missing on two or more occasions;
  • Is frequently away from placement (or their home) without authorisation;
  • Is at known or suspected risk of sexual exploitation or trafficking;
  • Is at known or suspected risk of involvement in criminal activity or drugs;
  • Has contact with people posing risk to children; and / or
  • Has been engaged (or is believed to have engaged) in criminal activities while missing.

The assessment of whether a child might run away again should be based on information about:

  • Their individual circumstances, including family circumstances;
  • Their motivation for running away;
  • Their potential destinations and associates;
  • Their recent pattern of absences;
  • The circumstances in which the child was found or returned; and
  • Their individual characteristics and risk factors such as whether a child has learning difficulties, mental health issues, depression and other vulnerabilities.

Consent

Prior to any interview conducted with a young person, the interviewer should inform the young person who this information will be shared with, when and why, and gain consent before sharing. If they are unwilling to accept an interview for fear of confidentiality issues they should be encouraged to call Childline on 0800 1111 where they can talk anonymously or ‘Missing People’ can help if you’re missing, thinking of going missing or someone you know is missing. Their freephone number is 116 000.

Where children refuse to engage with the independent interviewer, parents and carers should be offered the opportunity to provide any relevant information and intelligence of which they may be aware. This should help to prevent further instances of the child running away and identify early the support needed for them. Any information or support you can offer parents should also be considered.

Sharing Information

Sharing information is vital. In order to get the best from the Return Interview, the police should share information from the Safe & Well Check with Children’s Social Care in a timely manner. Similarly, relevant intelligence from the Return Interview should be shared with police in order to build an intelligence picture.

Next Steps

Police Safe & Well Checks and the LA Independent Return Interviews don’t offer much in themselves to prevent young people going missing again if no further action is taken. The outcomes of the checks and interviews should be recorded on case files so that they can be shared with professionals; they provide an opportunity to inform case planning for wider strategic planning and for professionals to take into account children’s views. Following the safe and well check and independent return interview, local authority children’s services, police and voluntary services should work together:

  • To build up a comprehensive picture of why the child went missing and address this;
  • To understand what happened while they were missing;
  • To understand who they were with when they were missing and where they were found; and
  • What support they require upon returning to home or their care placement in accordance with the ‘Working Together’ guidance.

3.7 Referrals

A person, other than children defined as Looked After, who meet one or more of the criteria in CYP Referral Criteria should be referred at the earliest opportunity to the Local Authority that has responsibility for their well-being.

LSCBs in Greater Manchester should consider how they will respond to such referrals, many of which may not be urgent child protection referrals. Social Care should make checks with other professionals who may be involved with the child, such as a school, community health, Probation or YOT to identify any other risk factors. There is the chance to signpost the person to early intervention services. Intervention meetings for children and young people should be held involving social care following certain trigger points or concerns around behaviour, as detailed in Section 6, Intervention Meetings (Children / Young People Not in Care) below.

CYP Referral Criteria:

Child or Young Person who:

  • Is/are at serious risk to themselves or from others due to their vulnerability;
  • Is/are known or believed to be at risk of harm from / due to:
  • Child Sexual Exploitation;
  • Trafficking;
  • Physical / Mental / Sexual / Emotional abuse (including Bullying);
  • Neglect;
  • Parenting Capacity issues;
  • Domestic Abuse – as victim or witness;
  • Forced Marriage / Honour Based Violence – as victim or witness;
  • Disability.


4. Additional Considerations for Children Missing from Care (MfC) - Including Foster Care

4.1 The Care Plan

Prior to each accommodation arrangement for a Looked After Child, the social worker must consider within the care planning process all potential risks to the child including an assessment of the potential for them to go missing. The child and their parent/carer should be involved in the planning process and it should be related to that individual’s needs, previous history and views. Missing episodes prior to the child becoming Looked After must to be taken into account.

Care should be taken when establishing where the child or young person should be accommodated:

  • Is the home “right” for that individual?
  • Will that individual fit into the existing structure of that home? 
  • How will a new resident interact with existing residents?
  • Are there external factors in the area of the residence which need to be taken into account when considering the placement?

When placing outside the placing (home) Authority, it is even more critical to properly assess the above issues. If there is a need to discuss specific risks or issues, the placing Authority should speak to the Safeguarding Unit in the Authority in which the child would live. When a placement is confirmed, the Placing Authority with Parental Responsibility must always follow the Formal Notification Process to inform the new Authority that a Looked After Child is being placed in their area (see Appendix B: Formal Notification of Placing LAC Out of Area - Letter with Form and contacts at Appendix A: - contact Local Safeguarding Unit or Social Care if unsure of local LAC Notification contact).

The initial Placement Plan is an opportunity for the care provider and the social worker to discuss with the young person issues around going missing and absent and to explain the rules and responsibilities of all involved. It is also the opportunity to provide the carer with details of the young person and their family and history. This will help carers to understand any risks to the young person or themselves if they go missing and it may help to locate the young person. The Placement Plan should cover:

  • Trigger points for absence or missing episodes;
  • Risks to themselves, the public and/or the carer before, during or after a missing episode including when being picked up;
  • What steps can be taken to reduce the likelihood of the child going missing and coming to any harm or harming others;
  • Friends and family details and contact numbers as well as addresses commonly found at;
  • Expectations of the young person:
    • I.e. curfew; when and how to make contact; consequences of lateness etc.
  • Expectations of the care provider:
    • I.e. at which point the Police will be notified, what processes will follow an incident, who will collect a child if they are missing, details of who conducts immediate assessments on their return and arrangements for full return interviews etc.
  • Agreements around rules for staying overnight at friend’s houses or going on trips. This is frequently cited as a major issue by young people who wish to behave like their peers who are not Looked After. As stated in Delegation of Authority Guidance, decisions on overnight stays should normally be delegated to foster carers and residential care staff. Arrangements for such decisions should be written into the Placement Plan or equivalent. There is no statutory duty for Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) checks to be carried out on adults in a private household where a child/young person may stay overnight and so restrictions should only be placed on Looked After Children if there are exceptional reasons.

All these elements should be reviewed during the care planning process. An example risk assessment and action plan which should form part of placement planning is provided at Appendix C: Example Missing from Care Risk Assessment and Action Plan.

The Care Providers together with the Local Authorities and all other relevant agencies should operate a system of intervention strategies designed to reduce the possibility of the child or young person going missing again, as stated under the Quality Standards for Children’s Homes (2015). These must relate to the individual young person and take into account their experiences and needs.

4.2 Corporate Parenting Responsibilities

When a child or young person is reported ‘Missing’, the carer(s), Local Authority with Parental Responsibility (PR) and the police have joint responsibility for protecting the wellbeing of the individual. Whilst the police are the lead professionals for the investigation of ‘Missing’ people, any child who is Looked After by the Local Authority remains the responsibility of that Local Authority at all times.

Equally, the act of reporting a child or young person MISSING (or Absent) by staff at the care establishment or foster home does not absolve the carers from their ‘duty of care’ to the individual and of continued duty to do what a ‘reasonable parent’ would do.

Reporting to the Police

As stated in the previous section, the Police will only become involved after all reasonable checks to locate the individual have been carried out. If the child / young person is not located, the reporting individual should contact Greater Manchester Police by dialling 101 to report them as being away from their address.

It is the responsibility of the care provider to inform the family and social worker of a child being reported missing, in accordance with local arrangements. It is good practice for the care provider to record all incidents of absence in order to build a picture of behaviour.

Publicity of Looked After Children

Before any final decision is made, the Police will discuss any publicity of a child or young person missing from care with the child’s care provider and social worker, who should involve their Senior Management as appropriate. This will be done in sufficient time for Children’s Services to notify the child’s parents / next of kin. Care providers or the LA with PR should have on file a recent photograph of each child that can be used in these circumstances.

4.3 Location and Return of the ‘Missing’ Person

Statutory guidance states that when a missing child is located, it is the responsibility of the residential staff or foster carers to collect the child, unless the circumstances pose a risk to them.

Where the locating officer has reasonable cause to believe that a child would otherwise be likely to suffer Significant Harm, he or she may take the child into police protection (Sect 46 Children Act 1989) and return them to the home address / place of safety / Local Authority accommodation or a place chosen by the Local Authority. A Police Station should not be considered an appropriate place of safety. Police Protection will not be used as a tool to simply facilitate the return of an individual.

Where no such risks are involved but the logistics of collecting and returning the individual make it difficult or impossible for the care provider:

  • Local Authority Care Homes and Foster Carers will need to make use of the Emergency Duty Team / Service (EDT) to assist in collecting the individual;
  • Private Providers must have their own arrangements to assist them with the logistics of returning a missing young person. This should be identified by the Authority with Parental Responsibility during the placement planning stage.

Children & Young People Subject to a Care Order

When a young person is in the care of a Local Authority and has subsequently absconded, they may be returned to the address they are committed to under Section 32(1a) and 32(1b) of the Children and Young Persons Act 1969. If any information is divulged by the individual that suggests they are not safe if they were returned home this will be discussed with the EDT (Emergency Duty Team) of the Local Authority with Parental Responsibility to establish a course of action and a place of safety. Officers will also consider markers on a home address that indicate CP (Child Protection) concerns or history:

  • If physically located by the police, they are to be returned by the police or taken to a place of safety. Once returned, the on-going report can be closed;
  • If physically located by another statutory agency (Social Worker / EDT/ Care provider), the locating agency must return the individual to a place of safety and the police must be informed they have been found and the report closed when they are back in a place of safety;
  • If physically located by family / friends, the care providers are to advise them that the missing person should be returned to the care provider at the earliest opportunity and assist in doing this if necessary. The police must be informed that they have been found and when they have returned;
  • If located by other means (i.e. telephone), the LA with Parental Responsibility / Care Providers are to make provision for the collection and return of the missing person.

Children & Young People Looked After under Section 20 (Voluntary Care)

  • Missing person located by the Police:
    When a young person is reported from a voluntary care placement, the Police have NO power to return the child without consent. When the police locate such an individual their first consideration will be any concerns for their welfare and/or the circumstances (or location) at which they have been found. Where necessary attending officers may consider the use of Police Protection Powers. If the locating officer(s) has no concerns for the welfare of the individual, they must:
    • Conduct a Safe and Well Check (SWC);
    • Notify the care provider of the individual’s location;
    • Ensuring the individual is safe, advise them on how to return home, where necessary, and otherwise leave the individual at the place he/she was located;
    • Close the report.

If the Police Officer considers no concerns to be evident and the care provider allows the individual to remain where located, this decision is to be recorded in both the officer’s Pocket Note Book (PNB) and on the Safe and Well Check screen on the OPUS system when completed by the officer.

  • Located by any other agency or individual:
    If the missing person is located by an agency or individual other than an agent of the Police, the following action should be taken:
    • Immediately notify the care provider of where the individual has been located;
    • Provide details of any concerns to the care provider;
    • Agree with the care provider an immediate action plan to safeguard the young person until such time as the local authority / care provider can arrange for the individual to be collected;
    • Subsequently the LA / Care Provider is to notify the police of the individual’s location and any concerns they may have in order that the police can consider use of Police Protection Powers and consider completing a Safe and Well Check (SWC).
  • Individual returns to the care placement of their own accord:
    If the missing young person returns to the care placement of their own accord the care providers must notify the police immediately so that a decision can be made regarding whether Safe and Well Check should be conducted and closing the on-going report.

See also Section 8, Specific Circumstances.

4.4 Out of Area Placements

Placing Authorities should clarify how care providers will record absence including ‘missing’ episodes to develop a picture of behaviour for review during care planning processes.

In cases where a missing child resides in one area and is reported missing in another, there can be difficulties over which police force should own the enquiry. The principle that the police area that receives the report MUST record it is particularly important in these cases. However, such concerns are secondary to the welfare of the missing individual, and a report should still be taken as it ensures the safeguarding of the child. Transfer of the case can be negotiated at a later stage.

It is the responsibility of the LA with Parental Responsibility to establish what provision they will make for Looked After Children to have Full Return Interviews, including those out of Authority. They may be done through the Care Provider’s independent arrangements if deemed satisfactory. Arrangements should be made clear to the LSCB and local Police.

If a full Independent Return Interview has been conducted, which does not highlight urgent issues, the Social Worker should discuss with the young person and the carer whether it is okay to wait and discuss the incident(s) at the next scheduled Review Meeting rather than make a specific visit at this time. The SW must take into account their knowledge of the child and placement and make a case-by-case decision.

4.5 Referrals (Children / Young People in Care)

Carers have a corporate responsibility to ensure the well-being of all children and young people in their care, which includes making notifications of missing incidents to the Local Authority which has Parental Responsibility, as per agreed local arrangements.

Greater Manchester Police will also make contact with Social Care in the Local Authority with parental responsibility for any Looked After Child who has been reported and classified as ‘Missing’ when the child meets one or more of the criteria below. These will be treated as contacts or provision of information by Social Care unless they are urgent referrals for child protection. Intervention meetings will be held involving Social Care following certain trigger points, as detailed in Section 4.6, Intervention Meetings (Children / Young People in Care).

Police can establish which LA has Parental Responsibility (or whether the child is Section 20 accommodated, in which case the parents still have parental responsibility) by consulting with the young person and / or the care provider. If in doubt, or there are concerns in speaking to the care home, GMP will speak initially to the Duty Team in the area where the child is currently residing.

4.6 Intervention Meetings (Children / Young People in Care)

The LSCB should regularly review and identify what services and interventions are available to reduce the likelihood of a child repeatedly going missing. As described below, intervention meetings should take place in the event of repeat episodes of ‘missing’ of any child placed in the LA area, even if ‘looked after’ by another LA. It should be clear who calls these meetings and how. They should have an identified purpose and be attended by members from all agencies with contact with the child or who may be able to offer support. For children from out of the area, their Social Worker and / or a placement manager from the home authority must attend. It is the Chair’s responsibility to ensure the meetings are recorded effectively.

The Missing Person Safeguarding Officer for the sub-region should be informed of the request for Police attendance at the meeting and this will be reviewed on a case by case basis depending on concerns raised. Wherever possible GMP will send a representative. In some high risk cases, the sub-regional Missing Person Safeguarding Officer may attend.

A routine check should be done with all services who might be working with the child to ensure representatives are invited. In areas with a specialist team for children at risk of CSE or trafficking, a check must be done to see if they are known to that Team and if so both must identify how to work effectively together.

At each stage of intervention any feedback from the child through return interviews etc needs to be available to be considered, if they have given consent (or if the information is crucial to securing their safety from harm). Following any intervention for LAC the care plan should be reviewed and agreed, particularly around triggers, reduction strategies, curfews and consequences for the young person.

Trigger Points for Intervention meetings – for LAC:

  • Tier 1 – trigger points to be identified locally based on carer, young person and social worker judgement (typically after no more than 4 incidents a month or one 24 hour period):
    • Social Worker should Chair;
    • Attendees: Police representative, residential worker or foster carer and family placement worker and other professionals as relevant to the child / young person’s needs e.g. school staff, school nurse, Child Support Team Worker, Youth Offending Team Worker, Connexions PA etc and any specialist Missing from Home / Care support services operating in that area;
    • The parents and child should be included wherever possible and appropriate and as a minimum their views should be sought and taken into account in discussing the issues and strategy. The Chair must ensure the outcome of the meeting is fed back to the young person and where appropriate their parents;
    • The purpose of the meetings is to identify any push / pull factors that need tackling, decide jointly on an action plan and identify any services that could provide support. Where appropriate the meeting should consider a referral to Social Care. In the case of ‘pull factors’ it may be necessary to target those in the community who harbour the missing person or exploit them with regards to crime, sex or drugs.
  • Tier 2 – When there are persistent concerns after Tier 1 meetings as agreed by Tier 1 meeting Chair and following any incident lasting more than 7 days:
    • Independent Reviewing Officer or nominated Senior Manager to Chair;
    • Attendees: Team manager from Children’s Services, Police Divisional Supervisor, Children’s Home manager / family placement manager (as appropriate), representative from health and / or education;
    • Meetings at this level should only be required for a small number of children. In addition to seeking to reduce future missing episodes and reduce any apparent risks to the child, this meeting should also quality assure compliance with the protocol. The frequency of this level of meeting provides an indication of the effectiveness of earlier intervention meetings and return assessments and services;
    • It is recognised that there will be some children who go missing repeatedly within a short period of time where this level of intervention will immediately apply.

If the child / young person continues to be reported missing beyond this level the senior management team for Children’s Services and Police should discuss how best to proceed.

Other risk factors demanding escalated and urgent interventions include:

  • Any case where the risks involved in even a single future missing episode is very high;
  • Cases where it has been identified that immediate action is necessary to ensure the wellbeing of the person.


5. Children and Families Subject to a Child Protection Plan

Registered Children whose whereabouts are unknown

If a child subject to a Protection Plan appears to be missing, as well as the usual reporting to GMP, the following urgent actions must be taken:

  • Urgent contact with GMP Public Protection Unit;
  • Immediately notify the key worker and the Register Custodian by telephone and confirm in writing as soon as possible;
  • Within 48 hours, or earlier if there are suspicious circumstances, key worker must initiate local inquires as follows:
    • All Core Group members;
    • Health staff (including GPs);
    • Education staff.

If these enquires prove unsuccessful the Police may make use of information as follows:

  • The local DWP office should be asked to search local and national records for information;
  • The Child Benefit Agency on 0845 302 1444, for any information they can supply;
  • UK Visas and Immigration can be contacted if it is suspected the child may be being taken out of the country without permission. Police have established procedures to obtain exit information from the UKVI National Border Targeting Centre (NBTC). This unit has access to electronic records of all passengers leaving the UK. In association with UKVI and Special Branch, arrangements could be put in place for the child and any accompanying persons to be potentially stopped at the airport / port. (See Appendix A for contacts.)

If the child(ren) has not been located as a result of these enquiries within seven days of the family going missing, the key worker must request an urgent Child Protection Review Conference. This should take place within two weeks unless the key worker and register Custodian agree to an extension for specified reasons. In any event, a Child Protection Review must be held within four weeks of the family going missing. This Review Conference will determine what further action should be taken to ensure the safety of the child and family.

Consideration should also be made of any vulnerable adults within the family or any possibility that the family are running away from a threat due to Domestic Abuse or ‘Honour-based violence’ etc (see Section 8, Specific Circumstances). These elements should be shared by Social Care with the Police.


6. Intervention Meetings (Children / Young People Not in Care)

The LSCB should regularly review and identify what services and interventions are available to reduce the likelihood of a child repeatedly going missing. Intervention meetings should take place in the event of repeat episodes of ‘missing’ as outlined below and it should be clear who calls these meetings and how. They should have an identified purpose and be attended by members from all agencies with contact with the child or who may be able to offer support. It is the Chair’s responsibility to ensure the meetings are recorded effectively.

The Missing Person Safeguarding Officer for the sub-region should be informed of the request for Police attendance at the meeting and this will be reviewed on a case by case basis depending on concerns raised. Wherever possible GMP will send a representative. In some high risk cases, the sub-regional MPSO may attend.

LSCBs should consider what interventions can be utilised for repeat incidents of ‘Absence’. This could include routes to refer to intervention meetings if concerns are raised.

A routine check should be done with all services who might be working with the child to ensure representatives are invited. In areas with a specialist operation that works with and identifies children at risk of CSE or trafficking, a check must be done to see if they are known to that Team and if so both must identify how to work effectively together.

At each stage of intervention any feedback from the child through return interviews etc needs to be available to be considered, if they have given consent (or if the information is crucial to securing their safety from harm).

If a meeting is to be held to discuss each child, the meeting should be held within a week of the trigger points above. An alternative is to conduct ‘MARAC-style’ meetings, to look at a series of cases which have reached these trigger points in one sitting, with the advantage of fewer meetings so more consistent and full agency attendance and the opportunity to discuss overarching patterns. In urgent or very high risk situations an interim meeting should be held sooner. (Contact Wigan LSCB for details of their model of assessment and intervention using MFH/C Service and monthly MOPs meetings.)

Trigger Points for Intervention meetings:

  • Tier 1 – trigger points to be identified locally based on LA, young person and Police judgement (typically after no more than 4 incidents a month or one 24 hour period):
    • A Social Worker should Chair;
    • Attendees: Police representative if necessary and any professionals relevant to the child / young person’s needs e.g. school staff, school nurse, Child Support Team Worker, Youth Offending Team Worker, Connexions PA etc and any specialist Missing from Home / Care support services operating in that area;
    • The parents and child should be included wherever possible and appropriate and as a minimum their views should be sought and taken into account in discussing the issues and strategy. The Chair must ensure the outcome of the meeting is fed back to the young person and, where appropriate, their parents;
    • The purpose of the meetings is to identify any push/pull factors that need tackling, decide jointly on an action plan and identify any services that could provide support. Where appropriate the meeting should consider a referral to Social Care. In the case of ‘pull factors’ it may be necessary to target those in the community who harbour the missing person or exploit them with regards to crime, sex or drugs.
  • Tier 2 – When there are persistent concerns after Tier 1 meetings as agreed by Tier 1 meeting Chair and following any incident lasting more than 7 days:
    • Independent Reviewing Officer or Senior Manager in Safeguarding Unit to Chair;
    • Attendees: Team manager from Children’s Services, Police Divisional Supervisor, Children’s Home manager / family placement manager (as appropriate), representative from health and / or education;
    • Meetings at this level should only be required for a small number of children. In addition to seeking to reduce future missing episodes and reduce any apparent risks to the child, this meeting should also quality assure compliance with the protocol. The frequency of this level of meeting provides an indication of the effectiveness of earlier intervention meetings and return assessments and services;
    • It is recognised that there will be some children who go missing repeatedly within a short period of time where this level of intervention will immediately apply.

If the child / young person continues to be reported missing beyond this level the senior management team for Children’s Services and Police should discuss how best to proceed and whether to escalate to more Senior Management in both or either agency.

Other risk factors demanding escalated and urgent interventions include:

  • Any case where the risks involved in even a single future missing episode is very high;
  • Cases where it has been identified that immediate action is necessary to ensure the wellbeing of the person.


7. Missing from Non Residential Settings

7.1 Missing From Acute Hospital (A+E / Medical)

When individuals are being reported missing from Acute Hospitals, either from an A+E Department or from a medical ward, staff at these venues must conduct a structured search of the premises prior to the police being called.

In all circumstances, staff must consider the following points before contacting the police:

  • What is the risk to the individual or what risk do they present to others?
  • In practical terms, what is known about the individual (A+E Specific)?
  • What are the ramifications of their condition worsening?
  • What actions do the hospital expect the police to take when the person is found?

Medical staff should be mindful that the Police have very few powers to return a person to a location without a valid reason such as a court order, if the criteria for s.136 of the Mental Health Act is met, if the Mental Capacity Act applies or if Police Protection Powers are deemed necessary to safeguard the individual from harm, in which case they can take them to a place of safety or A+E dept.

If there is concern for a young person’s safety or wellbeing, normal Child Protection Procedures should be followed, which could include making a referral to Social Care and / or discussion with the Designated Professional for the Organisation.

7.2 Missing From Mental Health Settings

Non return from Sect 17 MHA Leave

When a Sectioned patient fails to return from a period of Sect 17 leave, the reporting staff must attempt to contact the individual and secure their return to the unit prior to the police being called. If this is not possible, normal Missing From Home (MFH) procedures will be followed as per GMPs Missing Person police and Mental Health / Learning Disability Policy.

Disappeared prior to Mental Health Assessment

When an individual disappears from the control of medical services prior to a Mental Health assessment being conducted, the incident should follow the model outlined in Section 7.1, Missing from Acute Hospital (A+E / Medical). If a patient detained under s.136 MHA goes missing, the Police should be notified to locate and return them. If the patient attended A+E department voluntarily or was removed there under the Mental Capacity Act, then health personnel should only contact the police if risks identified to themselves or others deem it necessary. An ambulance or the patient’s GP or a CRISIS team should be considered to check on the person’s welfare.

Missing Sectioned Patient

A sectioned patient should be reported missing to the Police after mental health staff have exhausted their enquiries to locate them. At this point normal GMP MFH procedures will apply, and powers to return the individual to the mental health establishment will be contained within the section of the Mental Health Act under which they are being detained.

Once the patient is located the hospital are responsible for returning the patient to the ward, with police assistance in exceptional circumstances.

7.3 Missing From School / Educational setting

If a young person under 16 (or 18 if in care) is found to be missing from a school or educational facility (College / University), the educational authorities must inform the person or organisation with parental responsibility. It is the parent’s / carer’s responsibility then to notify the police of the missing person. If the individual is aged over 16 years (over 18 years if in care), the educational authorities may decide to report the individual missing directly to the Police.

The only exceptions to this rule are:

  • When managers of the institution make a professional judgment that circumstances indicate too high a risk so any delay must be avoided, such as for very young children or people with Special Educational Needs or disabilities;
  • Those resident at the school or educational facility (i.e. Boarding school) when staff may decide to report the individual missing directly to the police;
  • In cases where the educational establishment cannot get in contact with the person with parental responsibility;
  • If the school has concerns about compromised parenting and / or believes the parents will not report the young person missing in a timely manner. Reference should also be made to the Specific Circumstances (see Section 8, Specific Circumstances) discussed below. Schools should follow their usual Safeguarding procedures and report to Social Care where they have concerns for the child’s safety and welfare during or following a missing or any absent episode.

UK Visas and Immigration can support partner agencies with information on children who are, or who are suspected to be, subject to immigration control who are missing from education. Please use this form. See Appendix E: Children Missing Education - Home Office Request for Information.

Missing from school or an educational setting should not be confused with “Missing from Education” which is about an individual’s access, or lack of access, to education rather than their physical location.

7.4 Missing from Young Offenders Institutes and / or Lawful Custody

In such circumstances the individual, regardless of how reported, would be treated as a WANTED individual rather than a MISSING person.


8. Specific Circumstances

In dealing with missing people, there may be specific risk factors which need to be taken into account, as described below. Professionals involved in reporting a person missing must inform Police of any concerns around specific circumstances.

8.1 Individuals on the Sex Offenders Register

If an individual is known to be on the Sex Offenders Register, this information must be shared with the call taker when the initial call is made, regardless of the individual’s sex or age. The Service Desk will always check the Police systems following classification of a case and if necessary the case will be referred back to the call-takers to re-classify as ‘MISSING’.

8.2 Female Genital Mutilation (FGM)

FGM is illegal in the UK under Female Genital Mutilation Act 2003 (For England, Wales and Northern Ireland) and the Prohibition of Female Genital Mutilation (Scotland) Act 2005.

FGM is undertaken on British girls in the UK as well as overseas. Girls of school age who are subjected to FGM are often believed to be taken overseas at the beginning of school holidays, particularly summer holidays, in order for there to be sufficient time for her to recover before returning to school.

Guidelines to be considered when FGM is known or believed to be a factor in any missing episode are contained within Government Multi-Agency Practice Guidelines, with particular reference to:

  • Chapter 6 – Guidelines for Health Professions;
  • Chapter 7 – Guidelines for Police Officers;
  • Chapter 8 – Guidelines for Children’s Social Care;
  • Chapter 9 – Guidelines for Schools, Colleges and Universities;
  • The role of the Local Safeguarding Children Board is highlighted in Chapter 10.

For more on FGM please see Female Genital Mutilation Multi-Agency Protocol.

8.3 Forced Marriage

Unlike an arranged marriage, where the prospective spouses may choose whether or not they wish to accept the partnership, a forced marriage is when one or both spouses do not consent to the marriage or consent is extracted through duress. From June 2014, forcing someone to marry against their will is a crime and anyone found guilty can face up to seven years in prison.

There are occasions when families, who are attempting to trace a person who is missing in an attempt to avoid a forced marriage or other honour based violence, use the police as a “tracing service”. This presents the police and other agencies with a number of difficulties, and careful management of the situation is required, particularly when the person is located, highlighting the importance of the immediate risk assessment on location of a person and on the Safe and Well Check. Officers are reminded that where there is a forced marriage, there is also likely to be an offence of rape.

Other possible offences linked to Forced Marriage are:

  • False Imprisonment;
  • Abduction;
  • Kidnap;
  • Assault;
  • Sexual Offences.

See Forced Marriage and Honour Based Violence.

8.4 Domestic Violence (DV) and Domestic Abuse (DA)

There is sometimes a link between domestic violence and missing persons and identifying if a missing person is a victim or perpetrator of domestic violence or child abuse may have a critical influence on the investigation and in particular the way the location and return of the individual should be handled.

Informants are unlikely to admit domestic violence is a factor in the case. Previous history should therefore be taken into account but professionals should bear in mind this may not be currently relevant to the missing episode. Police should work with partners where Domestic Violence is known to be involved. Maintaining the victims safety and protection is the first priority of the investigation at all times. Police should be aware that the abuser may:

  • Report the victim missing in order to show false concerns in an attempt to hide the abuse;
  • Fail to report the victim missing to avoid a subsequent investigation;
  • Seek police assistance believing the police will lead him or her to the victim or even return the victim to the abusing relationship.

Officers should carry out full domestic violence checks on those that report partners and family members missing.

Locations of refuges must never be revealed to family members attempting to race a missing person.

See also Domestic Violence and Abuse.

8.5 Asylum Seekers and Trafficking

Unaccompanied asylum seeking children are likely to be placed in the care of the local authority. If they subsequently go missing, they are to be treated as missing persons, not failed asylum seekers or illegal immigrants. Many of this group may have been trafficked into the UK for criminal purposes. Young people at risk from / having been trafficked present a high level of risk of going missing following coercion and threats from traffickers. Young people may be unable to provide information about missing periods due to fear of retribution to them or their family from their traffickers. Anyone who believes that a person who is/was missing may have been trafficked should make reference to the procedure on Safeguarding Children Who May Have Been Trafficked.

If a person is missing who is known/suspected to be subject to immigration control any agency should contact Andrew Heseltine, Vulnerable Person Protection Manager for the North West, on Andrew.heseltine@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk or 0151 213 2260.

Practitioners should not be blinkered to the fact that “trafficking” does take place between differing areas of Britain, and even areas of Greater Manchester or within an Authority, and the victim of trafficking may not necessarily be from abroad.

Advice can be sought from the United Kingdom Human Trafficking Centre (Tel: 0114 252 3891 or 08447782406). This is an advice line that is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. You can also visit the National Crime Agency website for more information on trafficking.

8.6 Sexual Exploitation

There is a strong link between people (including adults and boys) being at risk of sexual exploitation and going missing from home or care - evidence suggest that 90% of children subject to sexual grooming go missing at some point (DCSF, 2009). Early intervention, effective monitoring and management of children who are reported as missing provides an early recognition of the possibility of Child Sexual Exploitation.

Concerns around suspected sexual exploitation could include:

  • The person is repeatedly reported missing from home;
  • The person is known to be visiting locations or addresses which raise suspicions around sexual exploitation;
  • The person has unexplained money, gifts, mobile phones etc;
  • The person has additional vulnerability; this is linked to the age of the child.

If sexual exploitation is suspected or a risk then the procedures on Safeguarding Children and Young People Abused Through Sexual Exploitation should be referred to and the person should be considered as high risk when reporting to the Police and during the subsequent investigation. See References for more information on the Government’s commitment to tackling Child Sexual Exploitation and the links to going missing.


9. Collecting, Sharing and Analysing Data on Children who go Missing

Early and effective sharing of information between professionals and local agencies is essential for the identification of patterns of behaviour. This may be used to identify areas of concern for an individual child, or to identify trends and ‘hotspots’ of activity in a local area.

Data and analysis of children who go missing both from home and from care should be included in regular reports to council members, especially to the lead member for children’s services and in reports by the local authority to the LSCB.


Appendix A: Contacts

For LSCB, Safeguarding Unit, Social Care Duty or Emergency teams and GMP Public Protection Investigation Unit (PPIU) contacts, see the Greater Manchester Safeguarding Partnership website. Contacts for referrals can be found here.

UK Border Agency: Andrew Heseltine, Vulnerable Person Protection Manager for the North West, Andrew.heseltine@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk or 0151 213 2260.


Appendix B: Formal Notification of Placing LAC Out of Area - Letter and Form

Click here to view Appendix B: Formal Notification of Placing LAC Out of Area - Letter and Form.


Appendix C: Example Missing from Care Risk Assessment and Action Plan

Click here to view Appendix C: Example Missing from Care Risk Assessment and Action Plan.


Appendix D: GM Return Interview Form Template

Click here to view Appendix D: GM Return Interview Form Template.


Appendix E: Children Missing Education - Home Office Request for Information

Click here to view Appendix E: Children Missing Education - Home Office Request for Information


Appendix F: Greater Manchester Police: Missing and Absent Persons Policy

Click here to view Appendix F: Greater Manchester Police: Missing and Absent Persons Policy


Appendix G: Additional Local Information

Manchester (Flowcharts)

Oldham

End